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E-Cigarettes and Ohio’s Youth

 

 

July is National Ice Cream Month! Tasty flavors belong in your ice cream cone- not in tobacco products. However, the tobacco industry uses flavors that appeal to youth -such as bubble gum and cotton candy- to entice youth into using tobacco products. This is especially true when it comes to electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) (also called electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes). In fact, a recent study found that there are over 8,000 flavors of e-cigarettes.1 Notably, almost 99% of flavored e-cigarette products contain nicotine.2

 

Over the past few years, e-cigarette use has increased an astounding 900% among youth.3 Currently, over one-in-five Ohio high school students use electronic cigarettes.4 Furthermore, in 2014, nearly half of Ohio high school students had ever tried an electronic cigarette.4

 

 Electronic cigarette use among youth is a serious public health concern for various reasons. According to the Surgeon General and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the use of nicotine products, in any form, poses dangers to youth 5,6,7 including:

  • Nicotine is a highly addictive chemical 3, 6

  • Nicotine can disrupt brain development, impacting attention, learning, and susceptibility to addiction3,7

  • Nicotine can prime young brains for addiction to tobacco and other drugs, such as cocaine and methamphetamine3

 

There is no safe level of nicotine exposure for youth. Grab an ice cream cone, and talk to your kids about not using any form of tobacco, including e-cigarettes. Tasty treats should cause brain freezes, not brain damage.

 

To learn more about the ODH Tobacco Program, visit our website or like us on Facebook.

 

Citations

 

  1. Zhu S, Sun J, Bonnevie E, Cummins S, Gamst A, Yin L et al. Four hundred and sixty brands of e-cigarettes and counting:

implications for product regulation. Tobacco Control. 2014;23(suppl 3): iii3-iii9.

 

  1. Marynak, Kristy L., et al. "Sales of Nicotine-Containing Electronic Cigarette Products: United States, 2015." American journal of public health 107.5 (2017): 702-705.

 

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. E-Cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General—Executive Summary. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016.

 

  1. Ohio Youth Tobacco Survey, 2014

 

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Youth and Tobacco Use. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2016. (CDC, 2016)

 

  1. USDHHS. The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

 

  1. England, L. et al. Nicotine and the Developing Human: A Neglected Element of the E-cigarette Debate. Am J Prev Med. 2015 Mar 7. [Epub ahead of print].

 

Last Updated: 7/10/2017