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West Nile Virus in Ohio

WNV activity in the area is much lower compared to this time last year. However, mosquito infections are on the rise and we are entering peak arbovirus transmission season, when most human infections generally occur. It is therefore important to continue prevention (personal protection, source reduction) and control efforts until the risk of infection has ended with killing frost.

Whether or not a pool of mosquitoes near your home has been identified as WNV-positive, you should always take precaution to protect yourself and your family against mosquito bites.

As of August 28, 2013 four human cases of West Nile Virus have been identified in Ohio.

Here are the latest mosquito test results as of 10/11/2013: 

Mosquito - WNV Test Results

Submitting Agency

mosquitoes collected

mosquitoes tested

Total (+)

1

Columbus Public Health

66,570

37,875

120

2

Franklin County Public Health

55,637

30,232

38

3

Delaware General Health District

1,369

1,369

2

4

P.H. Dayton & Montgomery County

13,213

4,799

9

5

Summit County H.D.

111,238

87,243

33

6

Barberton / Norton M.A.D.

30,407

13,498

9

7

Toledo Area Sanitary District

1,648

1,648

15

8

Cincinnati Health Department

808

781

3

 

Total

280,890

177,445

229

 

At this time last year (2012), there were 1,218 positive mosquito samples out of  180,252 mosquitoes tested.  Also, at this time in 2012, ODH had reported 114 human cases (6 fatalities) and 11 WNV positive blood donors.

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Ohio WNV Surveillance 2000-2012

2000

2001*

2002**

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

TOTAL

Human Cases

0

0

441

108

12

61

48

23

15

2

5

21

121

857

Fatalities

0

0

31

8

2

2

4

3

1

0

0

1

7

59

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mosquitoes Submitted

32,885

104,694

198,253

535,092

426,598

397,611

469,713

274,297

449,630

293,445

332,760

303,937

187,309

   # Counties

n/a

56

67

55

52

45

41

34

36

24

23

23

17

   # Agencies

41

55

81

81

64

60

56

49

45

32

30

34

26

# Mosquitoes tested

31,982

90,948

184,193

488,033

398,832

390,010

443,399

252,195

388,149

278,677

316,623

290,840

180,252

# Mosquito pools tested

994

2,636

8,092

19,663

14,202

14,705

15,300

8,240

11,017

8,413

8,843

8,472

6,332

# Positive pools

0

26

1,955

799

874

1,373

909

325

381

243

260

586

1,218

% Positive pools

0

1.0

24.2

4.1

6.2

9.3

5.9

3.9

3.5

2.9

2.9

6.9

19.2

** 2002 - first positive humans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The easiest and best way to avoid WNV is to prevent mosquito bites.  

  • When you are outdoors, use insect repellent containing an EPA-registered active ingredient. Follow the directions on the package.
  • Many mosquitoes are most active at dusk and dawn. Be sure to use insect repellent and wear long sleeves and pants at these times or consider staying indoors during these hours.
  • Make sure you have good screens on your windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.
  • Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying standing water from flower pots, buckets and barrels. Change the water in pet dishes and replace the water in bird baths weekly. Drill holes in tire swings so water drains out. Keep children's wading pools empty and on their sides when they aren't being used.

What Are the Symptoms of WNV?

Serious Symptoms in a Few People. About one in 150 people infected with WNV will develop severe illness. The severe symptoms can include high fever, headache, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, vision loss, numbness and paralysis. These symptoms may last several weeks, and neurological effects may be permanent.

Milder Symptoms in Some People. Up to 20 percent of the people who become infected have symptoms such as fever, headache, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, and sometimes swollen lymph glands or a skin rash on the chest, stomach and back. Symptoms can last for as short as a few days, though even healthy people have become sick for several weeks.

No Symptoms in Most People. Approximately 80 percent of people (about 4 out of 5) who are infected with WNV will not show any symptoms at all.


If You Think You Have WNV

People typically develop symptoms between 3 and 14 days after they are bitten by the infected mosquito. Milder WNV illness improves on its own, and people do not necessarily need to seek medical attention for this infection though they may choose to do so. If you develop symptoms of severe WNV illness, such as unusually severe headaches or confusion, seek medical attention immediately. Severe WNV illness usually requires hospitalization. Pregnant women and nursing mothers are encouraged to talk to their doctor if they develop symptoms that could be WNV.