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Burden of Injury and Violence in Ohio

Overview

  • Unintentional injuries are the leading cause of death and disability for Ohioans ages 1 through 44 and the fifth-leading cause of death for all Ohioans.
  • Suicide and homicide are the 2nd- and 3rd- leading causes of death respectively for ages 1 - 34 in Ohio.
  • Among the leading causes of injury death, unintentional drug poisonings increased from the smallest number of annual deaths in 1999 (327) to the greatest in 2010 (1,544).  For the first time on record, in 2007 unintentional poisoning surpassed motor vehicle traffic and suicide as the overall leading cause of injury death in Ohio.
  • Because injury affects Ohioans across the entire lifespan, including the very young and those in the prime of their lives, injuries account for more years of potential life lost (YPLL) than any other singular cause, including cancer, heart disease and stroke.

Visit the Injury Data and Publications page for injury data and fact sheets.

 

Burden of Injury in Ohio, 2000-2010

This report reviews injuries for Ohioans from 2000 to 2010.  Data for this report were derived from Ohio Hospital Association hospital inpatient discharge and emergency department (ED) data sets and Ohio death certificate files. Click here to read the report.

In 2010 in Ohio:

  • More than 7,200 people died from injury-related causes.
  • On average, 20 people lost their lives to injury and violence each day.
  • 217 occupants and drivers aged 15-24 were killed and 26,996 were injured in motor vehicle crashes in 2011.
  • There were approximately 72,000 injury-related hospitalizations and 1.4 million injury-related emergency department visits.
  • Falls were the leading cause of non-fatal injury in Ohio overall, and for most age groups.
  • Firearms took the lives of 1,131 people, an average of 3 Ohioans per day.
  • The overall leading causes of injury death in Ohio were:

Leading Causes of Injury

Injuries affect Ohioans of all ages; however one's risk for certain types of injury changes significantly over time.

Leading Causes of Injury Death by Age Group, Ohio, 2006-2009

Age Group

1st-leading Cause

2nd-leading Cause

< 1 year

Suffocation

Homicide

1 to 4

Homicide

Drowning

5 to 9

Motor vehicle traffic

Homicide

10 to 14

Motor vehicle traffic

Suicide

15 to 19

Motor vehicle traffic

Suicide

20 to 24

Motor vehicle traffic

Suicide

25 to 34

Overdose

Suicide

35 to 44

Overdose

Suicide

45 to 54

Overdose

Suicide

55 to 64

Suicide

Motor vehicle traffic

 65 to 74 

Falls

Suicide

75 to 84

Falls

Motor vehicle traffic

85+

Falls

Not specified

All ages

Drug Overdose

Suicide

Source: ODH Vital Statistics

Injury trends are on the rise in Ohio.

  • The overall number of injury-related deaths has increased by 33% from approximately 5,150 in 2000 to more than 7,156 in 2010.
  • Unintentional poisoning death rates increased more than 372% from 1999 to 2010, largely due to a dramatic increase in prescription drug overdoses.
  • From 2000 to 2010, Ohioans aged 65 and older experienced a 164% increase in the number of fatal falls. On average, 3 older Ohioans suffered fatal falls each day in 2010.
  • The numbers of homicides and suicides increased 19% and 27% respectively overall from 2000 to 2010.

Visit the General Injury Trends page for more information on injury trends in Ohio.

Injuries are costly. Injury prevention saves lives and money.

The consequences of injury can be far-reaching and severe. Of the millions of Ohioans who survive injuries, many suffer long-term consequences. Injury leads to huge societal costs, amounting to billions of dollars annually in health care expenses, worker compensation claims, lost productivity, rehabilitation and criminal justice system expenses among others. Investment in prevention programs prevents the much higher costs of dealing with these injury consequences.

Estimates of the direct medical costs of injuries as well as the work loss cost and quality-of-life-loss cost have been estimated for states.  Injury costs for Ohio are available at the following link: 

 

Last Reviewed 03/02/2017