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Stimulus Announcements

The Ohio Department of Developmental Disabilities, through an Interagency Agreement with the Ohio Department of Health, is now seeking qualified Ohio early intervention providers and parents of children who are or were Part C eligible to participate in “Master Coach” training.    These master coaches, over approximately 7 months, will receive training and coaching in evidence based early intervention practices of providing services in natural environments using a team approach and through family supports, and how to go forward, after the training is over, in providing training in these practices to teams of early intervention professionals. All work will be funded with Federal Part C of IDEA ARRA (stimulus) funds and will meet all ARRA work and reporting requirements.

 

Two Request for Proposals (RFP) are being posted to carry out these training opportunities;

·         “Master Coach:  Parent”

·         “Master Coach:  Local Provider”   

 

Please note that the deliverables and time requirements are significant, and the time line for applying is very short (applications due by 4:00 p.m. on February 16, 2011).  

 

To view the RFPs, go to the DAS website http://procure.ohio.gov/proc/index.asp , click on “Selling to the State”, click on “Procurement Opportunities”, click the Administrative category, click search, then click on one or both of the above titles.

 

Applicants must also indicate their expression of interest to apply for ARRA funds at:  http://www.recovery.ohio.gov/opportunities/state by the same (2/16/2011) deadline.  

 

Bidders who do not submit an expression of interest on this website by the due date of RFP  shall not be awarded ARRA related contracts under the RFP. This link takes you to the recovery page where you can click on the Request for Proposal and there is a link in a sentence under title “Current Funding Opportunities” that reads “submit your proposal” – that will take you to the page where you express your interest. 

 

 


Federal Stimulus Funds Two New Tobacco Cessation Efforts


The Ohio Department of Health has awarded grants to the Columbus City and Summit County Health Departments to develop and implement a peer advocate immunization project. The grants awarded total $165,000 each with a project period July 1, 2010- December 31, 2011.

The funds will be used to employ individuals residing in areas with low infant immunization coverage levels to serve as peer advocates within their community. These individuals will work one-on-one with parents of infants and young children to perform the following: determine the child’s immunization status;  remind parents when immunizations are due; identify immunization services providers in the community;  identify any barriers preventing a child from receiving needed vaccines;  and, developing relationships within the target community with local health care providers, churches, community-based organizations, and other agencies that can assist in keeping young children protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.

These grants serve the main goal of ARRA funding by creating jobs, while simultaneously providing ODH with the ability to implement a program that will improve the health of young children.


ODH Continues Efforts to Reduce Healthcare-Associated Infections

Awards Recovery Act funds to hospitals committed to improving Ohio’s disease reporting system 


Home Sewage System Program Funded by the Recovery Act (Recovery.gov)


Two of the positions for the ODH ARRA CPPW Component I grant have been posted:  Public Health Nutritionist and Epidemiologist Investigator 3. The nutrition position will be fulltime and oversee the nutrition MAPPS strategies of the grant as well as assist with the physical activity strategies.  The Epidemiologist will be providing data support and surveillance for all components of the ARRA grants, and is also full time. Please find more information at www.ohiomeansjobs.com or visit the following web sites:


The Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Division of Family and Community Health Services (DFCHS), Bureau of Early Intervention Services (BEIS) announces the availability of grant funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 to be used consistently with the current Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part C.  Help Me Grow is providing federal ARRA funds to County Family and Children First Councils to be used for programs under Part C of the IDEA.  These funds are to be used to preserve and/or create jobs for Part C service coordinators and/or child find and to assist in stabilizing HMG budgets in order to minimize and avoid reductions in essential Part C services.


Ohio EPA Awards Stimulus Funds for Home Septic System Improvements

More than $3.3 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Ohio EPA’s Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) will go to counties, cities and villages across Ohio to allow homeowners to repair or replace failing home septic systems. Ohio EPA and the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) are working with U.S. EPA to distribute the funds.


Hamilton County General Health District receives $6.7 million Prevention and Wellness Grant

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced March 19, 2010 the awarding of more than $372 million to 44 communities, to support public health efforts to reduce obesity and smoking, increase physical activity and improve nutrition.

The Hamilton County General Health District received funds for obesity prevention efforts.

http://www.hamiltoncountyhealth.org/en/index.html

The awards are part of the HHS Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW) initiative, a comprehensive prevention and wellness initiative funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

CPPW awards to cities, towns, and tribes across the country will provide communities with the resources to create healthy choices for residents, such as increasing availability of healthy foods and beverages, improving access to safe places for physical activity, discouraging tobacco use, and encouraging smoke-free environments.

In addition to the public health benefits of the initiative, the competitively-awarded grants will also support putting Americans back to work—an essential component of winning plans.  Communities will have two years to complete their programs.

To view a complete listing of grant awardees, visit http://www.hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cppw/grantees.html.

To view a fact sheet on Communities Putting Prevention to Work visit http://www.hhs.gov/recovery/programs/cppw/factsheet.html

To learn more about Communities Putting Prevention to Work, visit http://www.hhs.gov/recovery and http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/recovery.



The Ohio Department of Health submitted a Letter of Intent (LOI) for the ARRA funding opportunity Laboratory Technical Implementation Assistance for Public Health Cooperative Agreement Program CDC-RFA-HK10-1001ARRA10.

The Laboratory Technical Implementation Assistance for Public Health Cooperative Agreement Program will provide funding to advance public health laboratory capacity to share laboratory orders and results electronically with clinical care and public health agencies in order to achieve meaningful use.   A full proposal is due to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention by April 2, 2010.


Healthy Ohio Awarded ARRA Funding

The Ohio Department of Health was recently awarded funding through the Recovery Act Communities Putting Prevention to Work — State and Territory Initiative. Of the three major State and Territory components - ODH received funding for components one and three below:

  1. Statewide Policy and Environmental Change: States and territories submitting quality applications will receive funding to promote state-wide policy and environmental changes in support of the goals of this initiative. These policy activities will support and institutionalize healthy behaviors related to obesity control, nutrition, physical activity, and tobacco control and prevention. Strategies should be grounded in evidence and part of the MAPPS intervention model. All states and territories will be eligible for a base funding amount determined by population. ODH received  $1,448,591 in ARRA funds for this initiative.
  2. Competitive Special Policy and Environmental Change Initiative: States and territories can compete for funds for special policy initiatives. The funds should be used to implement at least one or more high-impact additional policy, environment or system change strategy to achieve health equity/eliminate health disparities in the area of physical activity, nutrition, or tobacco or a combination of these. Strategies should be grounded in evidence and part of the MAPPS intervention model. ODH was not funded for this initiative.
     
  3. Tobacco Cessation through Quitlines and Media: under the direction of CDC, states and territories submitting quality applications will receive funding to expand tobacco quit lines, in concert with expanded cessation media campaigns. States and territories will receive funding based on the number of smokers in their jurisdiction. Additional funds will be used for national efforts to support surge capacity, additional quit line monitoring and quality improvement measures.  ODH received $1,369,204 in ARRA funds for this initiative.

In total, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) awarded more than $119 million to states and U.S. territories to support public health efforts to reduce obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and decrease smoking-the four most important actions for combating chronic diseases and promoting health.

More information about this program can be found on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services web site: http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2010pres/02/20100205a.html


ODH Seeks Immunization Interns

The Ohio Department of Health is seeking 14 immunization interns using ARRA funds. These interns will work under the general direction of the Management Analyst Supervisor 1, assists in conducting immunization surveys in various counties within a defined geographic area of the state. Schedules visits to immunization clinics working in conjunction with the local health department. Interviews patients and parents of children regarding their reasons for attending the public health clinic to receive immunizations, identifies the health insurance status of the vaccine, identifies the client’s regular source of health care, and responds to questions regarding the survey. Enters survey information into a database, and transmits data to the ODH Immunization Program central office within a stated timeframe. Performs basic data analysis of information obtained from the surveys and reports the information to the local health department and ODH Immunization Program. For more information . . .


ARRA funds to enhance data collection for cancer registries

The Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, NCCDPHP, CDC will be awarding $20 million in ARRA funds to enhance data collection in central cancer registries for public health applications and comparative effectiveness research.  The Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER) funding for cancer registries provides a unique opportunity to expand the utility of the current systems, test and establish new public health functions for cancer registries, and create a new dataset for cancer research. 

The CER funding and activities will support up to 15 central cancer registries in reaching the following objectives:

  1. Improve the quality of data collected on race, ethnicity, staging and treatment
  2. Link cancer registry data with other state datasets to capture co-morbid conditions and geographic disparities
  3. Develop population-based outreach interventions to reach populations at high-risk for cancer incidence and cancer recurrence
  4. Improve data reporting from non-hospital sites by implementing automated real-time reporting mechanisms in pathology labs, pharmacies and clinical settings

Some activities are demonstration projects that may lead to sustained efforts, while others such as data capture via data linkages and expansion of electronic reporting are expected to be sustainable and adoptable by additional cancer registries, providing long-term benefit from this funding. 

Funding will be competitively awarded through a task order contract mechanism with sub-contracts to central registries which will complete the required activities, data collection, and data submission.  The funding is a one-time award.  However, registry activities and expenditures are expected to begin late in FY2010 and end in 2013.    In addition to ARRA reporting requirements, a set of performance measures will be used to track the progress of the activities.   More details will be provided as activities progress.


The Ohio Department of Health is seeking a full-time coordinator to implement the SEARCH Program.  For more information, please see the posting at www.ohiomeansjobs.com.


Ohio Department of Health responds to Communities Putting Prevention to Work Recovery Act
funding opportunities

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICESCenters for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act)
Communities Putting Prevention to Work

Announcement Type:  Cooperative Agreement
Funding Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-DP09-90101ARRA09
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.723

The Ohio Department of Health responded to this Recovery Act funding opportunity submitting its application on November 20, 2009. As the only eligible applicant for the state, ODH responded to all three components which included 1) Statewide Policy and Environmental Change 2) Competitive Special Policy and Environmental Change Initiatives and 3) Tobacco Cessation through Quit lines and Media. In total, applications for all three components totaled $7,517,795. Anticipated award dates for Components I and III are December 2009 and January 2010 for Component II.

Announcement Type:  Cooperative Agreement
Funding Opportunity Number: CDC-RFA-DP09-912ARRA09
Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Number: 93.724

This FOA focuses on two categories of activities: Category A: Obesity prevention, physical activity and nutrition and Category B: Tobacco prevention and control.  Applicants were asked to propose activities in Category A or Category B or both. The Ohio Department of Health released a Request for Letters of Intent to local health departments for the coordinated state application and selected the following two local health departments for each category. The Ohio Department of Health responded to this competitive Recovery Act funding opportunity submitting its application for Component A November 25 and Component B November 30, 2009.

  • Category A: Akron Health Department, Allen County Health Department
  • Category B: Holmes County General Health District, Licking County Health Department

Pursuant to the announcement, the ODH pre-selected communities are expected, with state assistance, to conduct the activities and achieve performance measures identified in Category A and Category B. The overall application budget for Category A is $4,765,969 which includes $4,411,925 budgeted for the two local health departments. Similarly, the overall application budget for Category B is $3,012,842 which includes $2,905,134 budgeted for the two local health departments. Anticipated award dates for Category A and Category B is February 26, 2010.

$120 Million for States Made Available as Part of Recovery Act Community Prevention and Wellness Initiative

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) today announced the release of $120 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds for prevention and wellness programs for U.S. states and territories, building on the recent announcement of the $373 million funding opportunity for communities and tribes around the country.  In all, the comprehensive Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiative will make $650 million available for public health efforts to address obesity, increase physical activity, improve nutrition, and decrease smoking.

The $120 million in cooperative agreements will be awarded to states and territories for three components: statewide policy and environmental change, tobacco cessation through quitlines and media campaigns, and special initiatives to create health-promoting policies and environments.  For the first two components, dollar amounts awarded to each state and territory will be based on population size and number of smokers.  For the third component, states will apply for special funds through a competitive process based on the potential health impact of the proposed activities. States and territories will have two years to complete their work.  They will coordinate their efforts with other Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiatives in large cities, urban areas, small cities, rural areas, and tribal areas. The application deadline for states is Nov. 24, 2009. 


Communities Putting Prevention to Work

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has created a comprehensive initiative for the $650 million allotted for chronic disease prevention efforts in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The goal of this initiative – Communities Putting Prevention to Work – is to reduce risk factors, prevent/delay chronic disease, promote wellness in children and adults, and provide positive, sustainable health change in communities. 

Communities Putting Prevention to Work will address the leading preventable causes of death and disability, namely obesity and tobacco use, by expanding the use of evidence-based strategies and programs, mobilizing local resources at the community-level, and strengthening the capacity of states. As a result of these efforts, powerful models of success are expected to emerge that can be replicated in other states and communities.

The cornerstone of the initiative is the Community Program ($373 million), with cooperative agreements to be awarded to communities through a competitive selection process. Communities interested in applying for Communities Putting Prevention to Work grants can find more information at www.grants.gov. The application deadline for the community projects is Dec. 1, 2009.  Deadlines for state, territory, and other prevention projects that are part of the Communities Putting Prevention to Work initiative will be announced soon.

The Ohio Department of Health is currently reviewing the Communities Putting Prevention to Work Funding Opportunity Announcement guidelines.


Ohio Officials Applaud USDA Loan for Muskingum Valley Health Centers

COLUMBUS – The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced last week that Muskingum Valley Health Centers will receive a loan for $2.3 million, through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.  This is a portion of $54 million in community facilities projects that was part of last week’s announcement. Governor Ted Strickland, Ohio Department of Health Director Alvin Jackson and Ohio Department of Agriculture Director Robert Boggs applauded the announcement.

See the full news release


HHS Announces $13.4 Million in Financial Assistance to Support Nurses

HHS Deputy Secretary Bill Corr announced the release of $13.4 million for loan repayments to nurses who agree to practice in facilities with critical shortages and for schools of nursing to provide loans to students who will become nurse faculty. The awards will come from two programs:

  • Nurse Education Loan Repayment Program ($8.1 million)
  • Nurse Faculty Loan Program ($5.3 million)

See the full press announcement

To learn more about these programs, visit the HRSA Health Professions Recovery Act Home


From the National Governor’s Association…

As the national dialogue on health care reform continues, health information technology (IT) and health information exchange (HIE) have emerged as critical means to ensuring a health care system that is affordable, effective, safe and transparent. A new report from the State Alliance for e-Health, Preparing to Implement HITECH: A State Guide for Electronic Health Information Exchange, aims to help states lead the way in using health IT and HIE and guide them as they begin instituting the federal Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Here's the news release about the issuance of the report.


HHS Announces $13.4 Million in Financial Assistance to Support Nurses

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced the release of $13.4 million for loan repayments to nurses who agree to practice in facilities with critical shortages and for schools of nursing to provide loans to students who will become nurse faculty. The awards will come from two programs:

  • Nurse Education Loan Repayment Program ($8.1 million)
  • Nurse Faculty Loan Program ($5.3 million)

See the full press announcement

To learn more about these programs, visit the HRSA Health Professions Recovery Act Home

This information has recently been updated, and is now available.


ARRA Failing Sewage System Funding Program

Nominations to receive ARRA failing sewage system funding was received from 49 county agencies and 12 cities  (10 cites in Cuyahoga County) totaling just over $8 million dollars in requests. Since the total requested amount exceeded the $5 million allotted for this program, a funding award rationale was developed with the goal of relatively even dispersal of funds across the state. OEPA has established a deadline of November 1, 2009 for completion of all repairs and replacements thus local government agencies were asked to submit the number of systems they could reasonably accomplish for replacement in this time period.  ODH and OEPA are very pleased with the response from local government agencies. 

OEPA will begin emailing contracts to the nominating county agencies at the beginning of this week (Aug 3) with all contracts to be signed/executed in the month of August.  Regular conference calls have been held with the nominating county agencies and local health districts to provide updates on the funding process.  Local health districts have been encouraged to identify potential applicants and begin working with those applicants on site and soil evaluations/system designs.  Any costs incurred by the property owner for these services, including permit fees, can be applied towards the 25% homeowner match requirement.  Local health districts and local government agencies have been asked to monitor the number of applicants under 200% of poverty for reporting to OEPA. 

OEPA and ODH will continue to monitor the progress of disbursement of the funds by county agencies.  By mid-September, an evaluation of spending progress will be made to determine need for possible reallocation of funds.


317 Immunization Funds

ODH Submits Application for Supplemental Funding for Reaching More Children and Adults

The Ohio Department of Health  (ODH), Immunization Program has been providing vaccines and technical assistance to local health departments, private providers, Federally Qualified Health Centers, Rural Health Centers, and hospitals since 1987.  In 1994, the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was introduced, which expanded  available funding by making vaccines an entitlement for certain groups (Medicaid-eligible, uninsured, Native Americans, and underinsured if seen in a federally qualified health center) through age 18 years. This has resulted in a “two-tiered” system in public health clinics, where VFC–eligible receive all vaccines, while non-VFC groups cannot.

Despite the increases in vaccine coverage, challenges remain if Ohio is to realize the Healthy People 2010 goals of 90 percent 2-year-old completion coverage and 90 percent influenza coverage for older adults. For instance, significant disparities (up to 20 percent) remain between 2-year-old children living in our state’s largest cities and those residing in some suburbs of those cities.  In addition, disparities exist between Caucasians and African-Americans for influenza and other adult vaccines. These differences exist even though many of the under-immunized have free vaccines available through various health care providers. Finally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that over 600 infants each year in Ohio are born to women chronically infected with Hepatitis B disease. Those babies have a high risk of developing disease in infancy. Unfortunately, the current disease and laboratory reporting systems are indentifying only 55 percent of the expected total.

The ODHIP will utilize ARRA funding primarily to purchase vaccines for children and adolescents not eligible for the VFC program, and expand the availability of adult vaccines not routinely available. Operational initiatives include:

  • Integrate the state disease reporting and Hepatitis B case management systems to help identify all babies born to chronically infected mothers;
  • Design and implement an adolescent immunization campaign to increase vaccine coverage in that group; and,
  • Initiate a peer-to-peer vaccine education program in several inner city areas with low coverage, through which community residents will educate mothers of infants and follow-up with them to ensure that children are vaccinated on time.

These programs will help to close gaps in the current program, leading to higher vaccine coverage and reduced risk of disease. ODH has been given approval by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to spend $1,425,070 for operations and $7,988,111 for vaccine. For operations, ODH responded to a non-competitive CDC FOA: # CDC-RFA-IP08-80305ARRA09 Reaching More Children and Adults. The CDC will be sending further guidance related to how to access vaccine. The Ohio Department of Health plans to discuss this program with the State Immunization Advisory Committee in late July.


ODH Applies for Grant to Improve Reimbursement in Public Health Department Clinics

Traditionally, a combination of state and federal section 317 funding has been used to purchase vaccines for administration to children and some adults, regardless of ability to pay. The increase in recommended vaccines, from three in 1985 to 13 in 2009, has created tremendous pressure on both the federal and state government to continue to provide adequate vaccine funding. In 1994, the federal Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was introduced, which expanded  available funding by making vaccines an entitlement for certain groups (Medicaid-eligible, uninsured, Native Americans, and underinsured if seen in a federally qualified health center) through age 18 years. This has resulted in a “two-tiered” system in public health clinics, where VFC–eligible receive all vaccines, while non-VFC groups cannot.

Anecdotal information from an informal 2002 survey of local health department patients revealed that approximately 30 percent had private insurance that covered vaccines. Furthermore, the insured group identified physician referral and convenience as the main reasons for using public health clinics for vaccinations. Those with health insurance that reimburses for vaccines can provide the funding relief necessary to allow ODH to move from a two-tiered system and provide all recommended vaccines to children attending public clinics. However, with few exceptions, public clinics in Ohio do not bill private insurance for childhood vaccines.

This grant will allow the ODH to conduct a formal assessment of the state’s local health departments to identify the true percentage of insured persons receiving publicly-purchased vaccines. In addition, if funded, ODH will:

  • Convene a work group of local health departments, insurers, physicians, and other interested parties to discuss billing and gain needed support;
  • Identify and address barriers or resistance to billing;
  • Develop models for cost saving and cost effectiveness; and
  • Develop an action plan that can be used to implement billing in Ohio’s public clinic clinics.

The intent of this supplemental demonstration grant is to provide support to Section 317 grantees that propose innovative approaches to increase the number of Americans who receive vaccine. The application ODH submitted was in the amount of $476,252 in response to FOA CDC-RFA-IP08-80302ARRA09 Supplemental for Innovative Projects to Improve Reimbursement in Public Health Department Clinics.


Secretary of Health and Human Services Hints about Chronic Disease ARRA Funds

As part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, $650 million was appropriated for prevention and wellness to carry out evidence-based clinical and community-based prevention and wellness strategies authorized that deliver specific, measurable health outcomes that address chronic disease rates. Though not an official announcement, Secretary Sebelius noted on July 28, 2009 at the “Weight of the Nation” conference in Washington, D.C. that most of the money is going towards a prevention initiative that was developed by the CDC and the Office of Public Health and Science with input from many health groups from around the country. Secretary Sebelius expects that a significant amount of the money will go to help states and communities attack obesity and other public health challenges.


Student/Resident Experiences and Rotations in Community Health (SEARCH)

The Ohio Department of Health, Primary Care and Rural Health Program, submitted an application for stimulus funding for “Student/Resident Experiences and Rotations in Community Health (SEARCH).”  Funding is via a contractual relationship with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Bureau of Clinician Recruitment and Services (BCRS).  The period of performance is for one  year, with options to extend for two additional one year periods.  ODH has requested $182,181 for its base year of SEARCH funding, $194,206 for option year two, and $225,536 for option year three. 

The main goal of the Ohio SEARCH Program is to improve access to care for underserved populations by developing culturally competent, community-responsive primary care providers who deliver high-quality health care through interdisciplinary practice in rural and urban communities.  The main objectives of the Program are:

  1.  to establish a network of key collaborators representing academic institutions, community-based safety net providers, professional associations, and state agencies that share a common goal of strengthening systems of care for the underserved by expanding linkages across health professions disciplines and between communities and academic programs;
  2.  to provide opportunities for health professions students and residents to participate in interdisciplinary clinical and community experiences with preceptors at a variety of safety net sites in rural and urban underserved areas; and
  3. to pilot community-based training in the Patient-Centered Medical Home model as a way of preparing participating students/residents and preceptors for this approach to providing comprehensive primary care for children, youth, and adults.


Ohio Department of Health applies for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to help reduce healthcare- associated infections (HAI) by focusing on prevention efforts

On June 26, the Ohio Department of Health (ODH) submitted its application for the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases (ELC) Building and Sustaining State Programs to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections program. (ODH)  applied for a total of $1,457,337 to address the three activities listed below.  The application is currently under review with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with a decision to be made by August 30, 2009.  Proposed activities and objectives of the proposal include:

Activity A: Coordination and Reporting of Ohio Healthcare-Associated Infection (HAI)

  1. Develop and submit Ohio’s Healthcare-Associated Infection Prevention Plan by January 1, 2010.
  2. Compute Ohio’s baseline measurements for at least two of the measures of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) prevention targets that are recommended by the ODH Director’s Advisory Committee on Emerging Infections.

Activity B: Detection and Reporting of Healthcare-Associated Infection Data (HAI Surveillance)

  1. Revise the ODH Infectious Disease Control Manual (IDCM) as needed to include HAI metrics and evidence-based practices.
  2. Train 200 individuals in HAI investigation, surveillance and prevention.
  3. Increase Ohio hospital participation in NHSN from 26 hospitals to 52 hospitals in year 1 and to 104 hospitals by the end of year 2.
  4. Create infrastructure for electronic laboratory reporting in 11 Ohio hospitals
  5. Develop sustainable state HAI reporting using CDC’s National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).
  6. Validate and evaluate NHSN reported data for accuracy and relevance.

Activity C: Establishing a Prevention Collaborative

  1. Create a statewide multi-center HAI prevention collaborative.

Ohio Health Clinics get $4 Million in Federal Funds

U.S. Representatives Tim Ryan (D-Niles) and Charlie Wilson (D-Marrietta) announced that several Ohio health clinics were awarded a total of more than $4 million in federal Recovery Act Capital Improvement grants (Source: “Valley health clinics receive more than $4 million,” WFMJ TV, June 30, 2009).

Among those receiving a portion of the $851 million in federal stimulus funds that are being distributed to health centers nationally are:

  • Ohio North East Health System's Community Health Clinic in Youngstown will get $880,910.
  • Akron Community Health Resources Community Health Clinic is in line for $520,060.
  • The Community Action Agency of Columbiana will receive $600,105.
  • The Ironton Lawrence County Community Action Organization is expecting $665,660.
  • Ohio Hills Health Services in Barnesville will get $473,860.
  • The largest portion of the money, $1,019,265, will go to Chillicothe-based Family Healthcare to build a new health care center in Meigs County.

"Community Health Clinics have an enormous impact on their communities - they employ physicians, dentists, nurses and medical staff - beyond outstanding services they provide to patients, a good number of whom are the uninsured," Ryan said in a news release


Women, Infants and Children (WIC)

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) provides the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) a total of $500 million dollars for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). Of that amount, $400,000,000 is dedicated for the program's contingency reserve to ensure that the WIC program will have adequate funds to cover potential increased participation or food costs as a result of economic uncertainty. Contingency funds would be used for covering administrative or food costs in excess of the existing grant amount for the states.

The USDA cannot access this contingency fund for states until all currently available funds are depleted. Ohio WIC is presently forecasting a surplus of administrative dollars for each of the next 2 years. In addition, Ohio WIC is also forecasting a surplus of food dollars this year but a small deficit for next year. This is a result of Ohio WIC having the 6th lowest administrative costs and the 14th lowest food costs in the country.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act also provides $100,000,000 to establish, improve or administer management information systems for WIC to include changes necessary to meet new legislative or regulatory requirements. As a result, the ARRA funds will also be used in part to advance the use of electronic benefits transfer in the WIC program. The Ohio Department of Health is engaged in this work using existing WIC administrative dollars. After careful review, the use of ARRA funds is currently unnecessary for completion of planned projects.


317 Immunization Program

On April 10, 2009 the Ohio Department of Health announced Ohio would receive $7.5 million in federal stimulus to provide vaccines to uninsured and low-income Ohioans. These funds, under the Section 317 program at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), provides for immunization operations and infrastructure necessary to implement a comprehensive immunization program at the federal, state, and local levels. Recently, Ohio has learned funding that was initially set aside for other projects at CDC has now been made available to states. As a result, Ohio will receive an additional $1.9 million in the form of vaccine for a total of $9.3 million in resources.

 Of the $9.3 million, $7.9 million will come to the Ohio Department of Health in the form of purchasing vaccine. Initially, Ohio was expected to receive about $6 million for vaccine purchases. The remaining $1.4 million will come from the CDC through a non-competitive supplemental grant to states entitled Reaching More Children and Adults. This operational funding is for initiatives that will improve systems for preventing perinatal hepatitis B infection, promoting adolescent immunizations, and assisting urban communities to increase childhood immunization rates. The application to the CDC is due on July 2.

More information regarding this funding can be found at:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/about/recovery-act-funds.htm

http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=p1cJKxlFHQtnP9VgX63xp31XX741Zv5pjksC3SyYbPDYvNc3X5Mb!-1618952969?oppId=47718&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW

Finally, separate from the above funding, but as part of the 317 ARRA funds, the CDC has issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) for a competitive demonstration project entitled Supplemental for Innovative Projects to Improve Reimbursement in Public Health Department Clinics. It is expected CDC will fund approximately 16 states to develop plans to enable public health department clinics to bill private insurance carriers for vaccinations. The Ohio Department of Health intends to apply for this opportunity. The application deadline is on July 2.

http://www07.grants.gov/search/search.do;jsessionid=p1cJKxlFHQtnP9VgX63xp31XX741Zv5pjksC3SyYbPDYvNc3X5Mb!-1618952969?oppId=47718&flag2006=false&mode=VIEW


Healthy Homes Demonstration Grant to Mahoning County

Mahoning County will be awarded $875,000 in federal funding under the Healthy Homes Demonstration grant program to directly control and/or eliminate environmental hazards in 144 housing units of families with children, provide general healthy homes training to another 600 families and asthma specific education programs to 200 medically under-served children diagnosed with asthma or other respiratory illnesses.

The Healthy Homes Program will target low to very-low income families with children in high risk neighborhoods of the cities of Youngstown, Canton and Warren and adjoining zip codes in Mahoning, Trumbull and Summit Counties, Ohio. The Healthy Homes Program will operate in partnership with 21 different communities and faith based organizations, area hospitals and critical local agencies including the United Methodist Community Center, the Akron Children’s Hospital Adolescent Asthma Center, the Mahoning County Public Housing Authority and District Board of Health. The project will leverage $825,000.00 in matching funds from partnering organizations.

Read more about this federal program.


Advisory committee input sought

June 2, 2009 -- On Thursday, June 4th from 1 to 2 p.m., a conference call will be held with the Ohio Department of Health Director's Advisory Committee on Emerging Infections about the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding opportunity: Building and Sustaining State Programs to Prevent Healthcare-associated Infections.


HHS announces $50 Million in ARRA funds for Healthcare Acquired Infections and Patient Safety Efforts

U.S Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced $50 million available to states through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to help fight healthcare associated infections (HAI) and improve patient safety.  About $40 million will be available to states through competitive grants to create and/or expand state based HAI prevention and surveillance as well as to strengthen the HAI surveillance workforce.  An additional $10 million will be allocated to improve the process and increase the rate at which inspections at ambulatory surgical centers occur.

Competitive Grants ($40 million)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have announced grant guidance for $40 million American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds related to Healthcare-associated Infections (HAI) Prevention as competitive supplemental funding to the Epidemiology and Laboratory Capacity for Infectious Diseases (ELC) cooperative agreement program.   Through this competitive supplement, CDC will fund and provide technical assistance to state health departments to make critical short-term investments that will provide for a sustainable state infrastructure on HAI prevention and significant progress toward preventing HAIs.  

  • Grants to up to 52 eligible states (State Health Departments, including Washington, DC and Puerto Rico)
  • Approximate average awards range from $100,000-$1 million for any one or combination of the following 3 activities:
    • A.    Coordination and reporting of state HAI prevention efforts  - develop and submit a State HAI Prevention Plan by January 1, 2010
    • B.    Detection and reporting of HAI data  (HAI surveillance)
    • C.    Prevention collaboratives to target prevention activities or initiatives in one of the following areas: catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI), surgical site infection (SSI), catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), Clostridium difficile infection(CDAD) or MRSA or other multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) infections.  
  • Application due date:  June 26, 2009
  • The Ohio Department of Health intends to apply for these funds and work with appropriate partners as provided in the grant guidance.

To review the entire funding opportunity announcement (FOA) please visit www.grants.gov   and check FOA# CI07-70402ARRA09:  Healthcare-Associated Infections – Building and Sustaining State Programs to Prevent Healthcare-Associated Infections.  This supplement is intended to address the HHS Action Plan to Prevent Healthcare Associated Infections.  Through this competitive supplement, CDC will fund and provide technical assistance to state health departments to make critical short-term investments that will provide for a sustainable state infrastructure on HAI prevention and significant progress toward preventing HAIs. 


Ohio to Receive $7.5 million in Stimulus Funds for Vaccines

April 10, 2009 -- COLUMBUS – Ohio received $7.5 million in federal stimulus to provide vaccines to uninsured and low-income Ohioans, Vice President Joe Biden announced Thursday.  "Every Ohioan who desires vaccination will be able to get it and that is good news for every one of us," said Ohio Department of Health (ODH) Director Alvin D. Jackson, M.D. "I expect to see Ohio’s already-high immunization rates to increase as a result of this funding." Read more. 


HHS Releases Funds for Community Health Center Expansion

March 27, 2009 -- The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services today released $338 Million to Expand Community Health Centers. . . Read more. 


Funds for Ohio centers detailed.


Funding Opportunities Page Updated

March 27, 2009 -- The Funding Opportunities page has been updated to include a list of competitive grant opportunities from the National Institutes of Health and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.


ODH Federal Stimulus Web Site Launched

March 25, 2009 -- The Ohio Department of Health  (DOH) has established this Web site to help provide information about ODH's and the state's response to the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), also known as the federal stimulus. This site is in addition to the State of Ohio's Web site, recovery.ohio.gov.