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BCMH Programs

The Children with Medical Handicaps Program (BCMH) has three core programs for children with special health care needs:
·         Diagnostic
·         Treatment
·         Service coordination

 

Each program requires medical and/or financial criteria to be met before a child/adult can be eligible to receive BCMH services.

Additional Programs

·         Adult Cystic Fibrosis Program.  This program provides limited treatment services for persons over age 21 with cystic fibrosis.  Financial eligibility is required.  The benefit package currently consists of prescription medications, medical supplies and public health nursing visits upon request.

·         Adult Hemophilia Insurance Program (HIPP).  HIPP helps with payment of health insurance premiums for persons over 21 years of age, with hemophilia or a related bleeding disorder, who meet the eligibility criteria as defined in Ohio Administrative Code 3701-43-16.1.

·        Genetic Services ProgramThe genetic services program funds a regional network of genetic centers that provides comprehensive care and services to those affected with or at risk for genetics-related disorders, and education about genetics to health professionals and the public.

·         Medicaid Spend Down Payment Assistance Program.   Individuals who are eligible for the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Medical Assistance Disability (MA-D) program may have a Medicaid spend down.  BCMH may pay for the family’s Medicaid spend down to enable them to obtain a medical card if it is cost effective for the BCMH program and the child is enrolled on the BCMH treatment program.

·         Metabolic Formula ProgramThis program provides metabolic formula to individuals with phenylketonuria (PKU), homocystinuria and other metabolic disorders.  Without special formula, individuals, especially infants and children, may develop brain damage and mental retardation.

·         Community Nutrition Services.  Children on the BCMH diagnostic or treatment programs who have a nutrition-related concern may request to work with a BCMH community dietitian.  Community dietitians are registered and licensed dietitians with additional training in pediatrics.  They work with the family during home visits to provide nutrition assessments and education.  Some examples of issues community dietitians can help with include evaluation of tube feedings, treatment for food allergies, strategies for gaining or losing weight, or any feeding behaviors that cause a caregiver concern.  To find a community dietitian in your area, contact Kim.DeDino@odh.ohio.gov or 614-466-0227.

·         Ohio Connections for Children with Special Needs (OCCSN).  OCCSN is Ohio’s birth defects information system and includes the reporting of children with birth defects, linking those children to services and programs to improve their outcomes and educating the public about preventable birth defects.

·         Premium Payment Assistance Program.   Families who are using a COBRA option or who are paying annual health insurance premiums that are equal to or greater than 2.5 percent of their adjusted gross annual income and whose child is enrolled in the BCMH treatment program may be eligible for this program.  For BCMH to enroll a family, it must prove to be cost effective for BCMH.  Families often are referred to this program by public health nurses or hospital staff.

·         Public Health Nursing Services.  Public health nursing services are approved for every child in the BCMH diagnostic, treatment and service coordination programs.  A public health nurse is:  a registered nurse employed by the local health department; skilled in working with children, families and medical/dental providers; and an expert in accessing local community agencies to help families.

·         Sickle Cell Services ProgramThe program funds a regional network of sickle cell programs that provides education, hemoglobin counseling and follow up on abnormal newborn screening hemoglobin reports and educates health professionals and the public about sickle cell disease, sickle cell trait and other hemoglobinopathies.

 

 

Last updated 1/3/2014