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Type 2 Diabetes

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The most common form of diabetes is type 2 diabetes. About 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2. This form of diabetes is most often associated with older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, previous history of gestational diabetes, physical inactivity, and certain ethnicities.  About 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight.  Type 2 diabetes is increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents, especially among African American, Mexican American, and Pacific Islander youth.

When type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, the pancreas is usually producing enough insulin, but for unknown reasons the body cannot use the insulin effectively, a condition called insulin resistance. After several years, insulin production decreases. The result is the same as for type 1 diabetes—glucose builds up in the blood and the body cannot make efficient use of its main source of fuel. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop gradually. Their onset is not as sudden as in type 1 diabetes.

Symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include fatigue, frequent urination, increased thirst and hunger, weight loss, blurred vision, and slow healing of wounds or sores. Some people have no symptoms.

What are the Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes?

  • Being overweight or obese.
  • Having a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes.
  • Being African American, American Indian, Asian American, Pacific Islander, or Hispanic American/Latino heritage.
  • Having a prior history of gestational diabetes or birth of at least one baby weighing more than 9 pounds.
  • Having high blood pressure measuring 140/90 or higher.
  • Having abnormal cholesterol with HDL ("good") cholesterol is 35 or lower, or triglyceride level is 250 or higher.
  • Being physically inactive—exercising fewer than three times a week.

How Can I Manage Type 2 Diabetes?

Ohio Diabetes Prevention and Control Program (ODPCP) in partnership with the Ohio Department of Aging and the Office on Minority Health put self-management into practice at the State and local level by effectively utilizing the Stanford University’s evidence-based Chronic Disease Self Management (CDSMP) and Diabetes Self-Management (DSMP) Programs, known in Ohio as Healthy-U.

These programs are provided to people with chronic health problems who attend workshops together for 2½ hours once a week for six weeks, and are held in community settings. Workshops are facilitated by two trained leaders, one or both of whom are non-health professionals with chronic diseases themselves.

How these Programs Can Help You:

  • Techniques to deal with problems such as frustration, fatigue, pain and isolation 
  • Appropriate exercise for maintaining and improving strength, flexibility, and endurance 
  • Appropriate use of medications 
  • Communicating effectively with family, friends, and health professionals 
  • Nutrition
  • Decision-making

For more information regarding CDSMP and DSMP:

Ohio Department of Aging
50 W. Broad St. / 9th Floor
Columbus, OH 43215-3363
1-866-243-5678
www.aging.ohio.gov

For More Information, Please Visit these Websites

American Diabetes Association (ADA) Programs
ADA Programs are diabetes education programs that are recognized by the American Diabetes Association and meet the National Standards for Excellence in diabetes education.

American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Programs
AADE Programs are diabetes education programs that are recognized and accredited by the American Diabetes Association and meet the National Standards for Excellence in diabetes education.


Last Reviewed 11/13/13